Monthly Archives: February 2013

Harvard’s Michael Porter Shares His Economic Outlook

Harvard Business School professor Michael Porter is a familiar name to almost anyone who has graduated from business school in the last twenty years or so.  He recently gave an interview on CNBC in which he shares his analysis of the U.S. economy.  Porter is best known for his work in competitive strategy, a field in which he is considered the preeminent expert, so his views of what ails the U.S. economy and how we can get back on track are of considerable interest.  He has analyzed the forces that provide one country or region with relative competitive advantages vs. others and he applies this perspective in his commentary. Continue reading

Choosing and Paying for Higher Education

I am now at an age at which many of my friends have kids preparing for, or going to, college.  I have a few more years to figure out the details, but this is an issue that I have followed for a long time.  My local in-state university, the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU), estimates the all-in cost of attendance at $26,000 per year.  This varies a bit, based on which program you choose.  Tuition, fees, and books cost about $14,000 per year (though this varies by program) and the estimated cost of room and board is about $12,000 per year.  Continue reading

The Great Rotation?

The financial media loves a catch phrase and, with the apparent emotional hook of the ‘fiscal cliff’ diminished, we needed a new one.  The current best candidate is the so-called ‘Great Rotation.’  The idea here is that investors, finally and completely fed up with the dismal returns from bonds, are going to move heavily back into equities.  This is the ‘Great Rotation.’  When I Google the term, there are 820,000 search results.  Not bad for a phrase that was invented in October 2012 (in a research note from Bank of America, apparently).  Continue reading

The Strange Case of Apple Stock and Structured Products

Jason Zweig at the Wall Street Journal published a disturbing article that deserves more attention.  The basic story is this.  A number of banks sold a complex financial product to retail investors who have subsequently lost quite a bit of money.  Here is the basic pitch that was apparently made to individual investors in 2012.  You are going to buy an investment product that is currently invested in bonds and is producing 8% in income per year.  The performance of this product is tied to the stock price of Apple, however.  In exchange for the high income, you take on the risk of a decline in Apple’s stock price.  These products were sold when Apple stock was soaring, so a fair number of people apparently saw this as a favorable bet.  With the stock down more than 30% from its peak, many of these investors have lost a considerable amount of money.  Read Zweig’s piece for more details.  These products have a number of variations and he discusses one specific structure.  Here is another.  The title of Zweig’s article, How Apple Bit Bondholders, Too, gives the impression that bonds were responsible for these losses.  This is not the case, but the title serves to illustrate the subtlety of the problem.  Continue reading